It is been quite a time since Virgin Steele has released a very successful full-length album, commercially speaking, but the legendary American band is always here with us, alive, releasing new music and playing live! Virgin Steele belongs to the classic metal groups and its every move is great news for all of us. David DeFeis and company are in the spotlight again, as they are re-issuing their first two studio albums, "Virgin Steele I" (1982) and "Virgin Steele 2/Guardians of the Flame" (1983), and are releasing a 35th-Anniversary box set ("Seven Devils Moonshine", which will contain three new albums!) on November 23, 2018. Myth of Rock immediately thought it was a great opportunity to speak with the band's singer and mastermind, David DeFeis, who accepted our invitation and answered all our questions - we talked about the past, the present, the future, and everything related to Virgin Steele. So, ladies and gentlemen, hats off to David DeFeis and Virgin Steele!

by Dimitris Zacharopoulos


The first two albums of Virgin Steele are being reissued by No Remorse Records. Why did you decide to re-release these albums? How did you come in contact with No Remorse Records?

In truth I actually had no intention of re-issuing those two albums at this time. It was not at all on my mind because I have been so involved and still am involved in lots of new music. I was approached by No Remorse Records who inquired if it might be possible to re-issue them…I was at first not that interested because as I stated I already had so much on my plate, but we started to speak and had several very nice conversations and fairly quickly came to an agreement and now…here we are…all is ready to go and they have done a beautiful job!

Are you the one who decided about the remixes and the bonus tracks of these two re-releases?

Yes, I handled all of that as I always do.

What do you recall from the first days of Virgin Steele?

Everything! My memory is intact. I recall how we all met, the first rehearsals, the recording sessions…the first concerts…all of it. It was quite an amazing time. We were very inspired and we exploded and we went for it and quickly became very well known in our immediate area and then in what seemed like no time at all we had serious interest from people all around the world. We pressed up the first album and I sold it from the trunk of my car and before that first pressing was sold out we had two record deals, one with Mongol Horde in the States and one in England with Music For Nations. In fact we were MFN 1 the very first release on this new label that soon acquired W.A.S.P., Mercyful Fate, Ratt, Manowar and tons of other wonderful metal bands.

Please describe us how you became the singer of Virgin Steele.

A long curly haired drummer named Joey Ayvazian, and a guitarist named Jack Starr were rehearsing together and trying to get something serious going, while at the same time I was playing in various groups with a bass player named Joe O’Reilly, when one day I saw an advertisement in a local music paper stating that some metal musicians were searching for a singer and there was some kind of tour planned. Excited and intrigued … I answered the ad … met with Joey and we arranged to meet up for a jam at a nearby rehearsal studio the next day. I arrived on time ready to rip, but there was nothing scheduled for us as Jack had forgotten to book the time. I was still very gung-ho, so I suggested that he and Jack come back to my house where I had all my gear set up, to afford them the opportunity to hear my singing and keyboard playing. I played three songs for them, “No Quarter', by Led Zeppelin, “Child In Time”, by Deep Purple and “Catch the Rainbow”, by Rainbow. They liked what they heard and asked me to join the band then and there. While I was flattered and interested, remember … I had not yet had the opportunity to hear them play. So … I suggested that we actually all jam together first to see if we could spark, and Jack did set up a jam … but when I arrived at the studio for this second attempt … Joey the drummer I had met and kind of bonded with, wasn’t on the kit! I thought … hmmm … ”strange” … Some other guy was there on drums and there was also another guitar player present who sang … We played and it was sort of nice … but I wasn’t really into the drummer or the bass player, or having another singer around, plus I wanted to hear Joey play because we had clicked and I liked him very much as a person … I said to Jack, “hey I like what you’re doing but I want to hear the drummer I met and I have a great bass player who would be perfect for this” … he said, “OK great, let’s arrange for another jam”, and finally Jack, Joey, Joe “O”, and I all did jam together a day or so later. And so the two factions finally assembled and we clicked musically right away. We rehearsed for about three weeks and entered the studio to record what became “Virgin Steele I”. The album was recorded mostly live in the studio, and the entire production cost about $ 1,000 dollars and took maybe about a week to record and mix.

How was your cooperation with guitarist Jack Starr?

Back in those days it was fine. We all got along pretty well most of the time. Now and then we had the usual occasional disagreements but nothing major.

How do you see now the first two Virgin Steele albums? Do you like them? How much have you progressed since then, as a band and as a musician?

I see them as essays in the craft before it was fully sown…wild, passionate raw performances with some very cool songs. I love them…I love all the albums for different reasons. The group has progressed enormously since those days in so many areas, and I as a musician, composer, etc. have added many more strings to my bow. Especially as a writer/composer that is where my main strengths are.

How would you define the music of “Virgin Steele I” and “Virgin Steele II”?

At the time we called it metal, power metal, crazy metal … it was also called progressive metal … some of it was bluesy metal or hard rock … some of it was on the epic side … some had early “symphonic” touches.

Which is your favorite track of “Virgin Steele I” and your favorite track of “Virgin Steele II”?

On “Virgin Steele I” I think I enjoy “Danger Zone”, “Living in Sin”, “Children of the Storm” and the song “Virgin Steele”. On “Virgin Steele II” … I enjoy “Don’t Say Goodbye”, “A Cry in the Night”, and perhaps also “Guardians of the Flame” the most. I remember listening to the playback of the final mixes in the studio and being completely amazed at the sound and the fact that we had captured this grandiose epic quality and distilled all of our various personalities into these tracks.

If you could turn back time, what would you do differently as far as these first two albums are concerned?

I might want to spend more time recording and mixing because I always want that!

How much different were things for heavy metal music back in the beginning of the 80s? Are you satisfied with the current condition of Virgin Steele?

It was a more wide-open time…the scene was actively more engaging and alive. There actually was a music business, a photography business and all the peripheral things that go along with making music, making records … etc. If you are asking me “am I satisfied with where Virgin Steele is at creatively and musically speaking”, then the answer is a most resounding “yes I am”. I think the songs have gotten stronger and stronger over the years and the core chemistry is more intuitive than ever before, and we have managed to capture more and more of the passion, the raw emotion of our lives in sound … The albums we make reflect the sound of our living world if you will…

Three years have passed since the release of your latest studio album (“Nocturnes of Hellfire & Damnation”). Have you written any new material? If yes, how does it sound? When should we expect your new full-length studio album?

Always … I continually have numerous albums in the works and in various stages of completion. I am always writing and we are always recording. We will be releasing a box set in November that in addition to containing the last two re-issues, will feature three discs of new material in various styles from aggressive barbaric-romantic metal to epic gothic bluesy metal to stripped down orchestral type recordings … all sorts of stuff, because it is a box set and for such an item I think one should go deep and occasionally provide some left hand path type material. Our last album contained twenty nine songs, and every re-issue we have unleashed has contained new music, therefore we weren’t in too great a rush to release something immediately following that last album. We wanted people to get to know the material we had already put out first, before releasing more new material.

Give us the details about the two videos you recently released for the songs “When Dusk Fell” and “Black Light On Black”.

What do you wish to know? They are both from the re-mixed version of our “Visions of Eden” album and they were both filmed on Long Island where we live. A lot of footage was done in the cold, cold winter and some of it was filmed in a nearby cemetery. We tried to infuse the clips with the emotions of the songs and show something of our beliefs, our personalities, and what our life is like here.

If you had to choose between being a romantic and being a barbarian, what would you prefer to be, and why?

Some days some nights … some moments I feel more barbaric than romantic and at other times quite the opposite … it all depends on how I am motivated by the stimuli around me. In my day-to-day life in dealing with people, places and things that I would prefer to not have to deal with, I tend to push the barbaric side of my nature to the fore … but among friends and people I care about deeply I try to more … “romantic”…

If you could travel in time, which period of history would you choose?

I do have a special affinity for 1692 Salem, Massachusetts, but I don’t think I would want to remain there too long as I would probably be condemned as a witch … Perhaps the earliest recorded days of the human race would be interesting … Ancient Babylon … Sumeria … or certainly Ancient Greece … when the Gods & Goddesses were all quite young or not yet born … when the Titans still reigned …

What do you think of modern metal? Do you like any modern metal bands?

There are some wonderful musicians out there doing metal these days, but to be honest I don’t really follow too much of it. Occasionally certain bands get brought to my attention and I always listen and I usually enjoy it … there is always so much to discover or re-discover as the case may be.

If Jack Starr asked you to come back to the band, which would be your reaction?

I have a very strong special chemistry with Edward Pursino that is still inspiring and we barely have enough time to do all the things we want to do together. That’s not to say that I have any issues with Jack. I wish him well in all that he is doing and who knows, as far as maybe a track or something like that happening down the road I suppose that is always possible, but nothing like that is on my mind at this time. We are already working on the next two new “concept type” albums and have been tracking guitars for days now … and there is still much to do in order to complete them for release sometime next year.

Which are your plans for the future? What about a tour?

The immediate future will bring forth the five disc box set in November and then work on these two new full-length “concept” type albums that we have already begun and of which I started speaking about above, and yes … live shows.

A message to your Greek fans!

Certainly!!! CHEERS FRIENDS!!! BY THE GODS & GODDESSES to you ALL!!! We have missed you! We do hope to visit the Home Of The Gods & Goddesses once again very soon. You will always hold a hugely special place in our Hearts…ETHARISTO POLI to YOU ALL!

Thank you very much, Mr. DeFeis.

Hail and all the very best to you and to your readers always.


 

 

As a result of the financial crisis in Greece, many young people are seeking something better in foreign lands. This may also happen in the world of music - there are Greek bands which are moving abroad, in order to have a better luck and more chances in their career. One of these bands is 7he 7ouch, who moved to London, England, to pursue their dreams. I incidentally came across the band's music video for the song "Solution" and I was really blown away! So, it was a matter of time to conduct an interview with 7he 7ouch, who announced these days the official release of their debut EP, "SEVENTYSEVEN". The band answered gladly all Myth of Rock's questions and I am sure you will find the following chat very interesting. Let's go!

by Dimitris Zacharopoulos 


   

When and how were 7he 7ouch formed?

Everything first started back in 2012 when two different childhood friendships; [Constantine (vocals), Stelios (guitar) and John (guitar), Toni (bass), Apostolis (drums)]  got together for a jam in the studio as John and Constantine were working on some new ideas and needed to jam on then in the studio. We really enjoyed ourselves being together and this is how 7he 7ouch were formed. It was the need to escape from our daily routines and the lust to create new music/sounds. Later the same year and due to the financial crisis in our country, Apostolis decided to take another direction in his life and moved to Canada in 2013. After several years of seeking for the right fit to fill for Apostolis shoes, we met Dave and we officially reformed 7he 7ouch.

Why did you decide to move to London?

It was back in the fall of 2014. Greece wasn’t at the best place back in the day and music in Greece as well. We decided that we wanted to take a leap and start a career in London and then we did it.

How much difficult was it for you to leave Greece and settle down in England?

Every new beginning has its difficulties and obstacles to overcome. The first days were tough but we learned from it. The most important thing was that we had each other.

How are things for rock bands in England nowadays? Which are the differences between the situation in England and the situation in Greece?

Rock is the SOUND in England. Let’s not forget that UK is the mainland of rock music, see The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, Motörhead and you know the list goes on and on. There is a lot of activity here, everybody is a music enthusiast and rock music is a big part of the English culture. The competition (always talking about a friendly competition) is very high and this can only make you be better every day. We think Greece has some great bands and musicians, even though the music industry is focused on different genres there are some great bands starting coming to prominence and tour globally. It is very much harder for a band based in Greece to succeed and have an international career in comparison to many English based bands, as the industry here is very much developed and focuses and invests on the artists.

If a young Greek musician asked you if he/she should leave Greece and move to England in order to become a professional musician, what would you suggest to him?

We would suggest them to follow their heart and do what they love. Focus on your goals and never let it slide away.

Which are your releases until now? Give us all the details about your upcoming EP release.

We have just announced the release of our debut EP for October 29th. It will be called “SEVENTYSEVEN”. “Solution” is the first single we released on the 9th of July. All we can say is that we are very proud of it. It sounds BIG, it is melodic and heavy at the same time. We can’t wait to share it with you.

How would you describe your music? Can we define it as alternative hard rock?

We are not big fans of putting titles to our music. It can be alternative and it can be hard-hitting rock ‘n roll at times but 7he 7ouch is something more than this. You can definitely say that we are a rock band but at the same time, there are a lot more elements that can be put into the mix. We all have different influences and this sometimes can work great and bring something refreshing to the sound.

You have played a lot of live shows until now. How much and in which way have these live gigs helped the band?

You can only improve and get better by playing live. We‘ve had a lot of shows over the years and this made each of us better at their instrument and of course, it made the band sound tighter. The more a band can play live the better. At the end of the day, this is what it is all about. Playing live music.

Who are the main composers in 7he 7ouch? Which are your music influences?

Mainly most of our ideas are usually coming from Constantine and John and then we are all gathering and working on the development of them. Regarding our influences, we all differ in taste and preferences but we definitely complete each other. Everyone in the band is, of course, listening any piece of music and artist that is sounding right but we all have our favorite eras like most of the people. John and Toni are more excited about the beginning of rock n’ roll and how the sound of it gradually became harder and harder. John is a 60's and 70's rock, blues and heavy metal admirer. Toni is absolutely an 80's freak. Constantine and Stelios are definitely kids of the 90's and 2000's with many nu-metal influences and still exploring the newest genres for new sounds. Dave is the only one that actually studied music so he has a greater opinion of the music genre spectrum and also loves hip-hop and rap music.

Which elements are the most significant for you: melody, energy, passion, feeling?

It all comes together. You can’t have a melody without the energy to deliver it. You can’t have energy if you are not feeling passionate about something. And to be able to do all the above that requires from your inner self be able to have feelings.

Who is the lyrics writer? Where do the lyrics refer to?

Constantine and John are the main lyricists and the theme can vary. We are considering ourselves as very concerned and sensitive humans about the world and the people surrounding us. It can be political, it can be love, it can be everything. Everything that we see and go through our everyday life it all reflects to us.

Do you prefer to produce your own songs or to cooperate with a person outside the band?

We love working with other people outside the band. You get to learn things from them and always helps having a second opinion from someone you know that truly cares for you and is outside the band.

Do you have a record deal with a record label yet? If not, are you in negotiations with any record labels?

At the moment we are moving on independently.

Why did you decide to name the band “7he 7ouch”?

It just happened when we were trying to figure out a name for our band and then Toni came up with “Touch” we thought it sounded cool and added the “the“ to it. We realized that there’s another band with the same name in America, so we came up with the idea of adding the 7’s instead of T’s.

Which are your dreams/ambitions for 7he 7ouch?

We would like to be seen as the type of artists that want to contribute to the shaping of  rock music in the future, while respecting and acknowledging all the phases rock n' roll went through in the past and in that way our desire is to be at the front line of the new era of rock n' roll.

Which are your future plans, apart from releasing your EP?

Play as many live shows as we can, potential tour in the fall and record some new music.


Spotify : http://smarturl.it/spotify-77

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Youtube : http://smarturl.it/YTsubscribe77

 

 

Monument are one the best and most promising traditional heavy metal bands of our times. Their albums are full of powerful, storming songs with great melodies and soaring vocals, and their live shows meet the highest expectations. Greek fans had the chance to enjoy Monument in Rockwave Festival 2018, where the British band really rocked big time. After Monument’s performance, Myth of Rock talked with the frontman of the band, Peter Ellis, who gladly answered our questions and said very interesting things. Read the following lines and keep in mind that Monument are here to stay!

by Sylvia Crystal


You played live in Rockwave Festival, Greece, the day that Iron Maiden were the headliners. How do you recall this live gig?

Really warm, haha! It was the most challenging gig of the summer so far due to the hot temperatures but at the same time the crowd was the loudest of all the festivals we have played so far. Of course for me, on a personal level, it is always special when we play Greece as I was born and raised in Athens.

This concert wasn’t the first Monument live gig in Greece, since you had played with Iced Earth in 2016. How much has the band progressed since 2016?

Things are a lot busier now and the band is now one of the rising forces in European metal across the continent, which is really cool. Our management team and us have put a lot of time and effort into this, so it is great to see the band getting bigger and bigger.

In your opinion, which was the best moment and which was the worst moment in your tour until now?

Rockwave was actually both, the best and worst moment for us, haha! It was the worst because of the extreme heat on stage, but also the best due to the amazing Greek audience that sent us so much energy and positive vibes during our set.

How do you feel, when you enter the stage? Do you have any stress? Do you think of something certain?

I never get stressed before going on stage, regardless of whether we are playing for 200 people or 20.000. I was born into a show business family, so live performance is in my blood.

Your latest album, “Hellhound”, was praised by both journalists and fans. How do you see that album now, some months after its official release? Are you satisfied with it, artistically and commercially?

I could not be happier with the album and how good it’s doing. We knew we had a really strong album going in, so it is nice to see that our good feeling was right.

Could you please describe the relationship between Monument and the fans? Are you satisfied with this relationship or it can get even better?

I think we have a very special bond with our fans, we always take the time to interact with them either at shows or online and we feel we have a responsibility to keep making our fans proud by delivering the best new music we can in every album and putting 100% into every live performance.

Could you please select three adjectives to describe what “Hellhound” album is and three adjectives to describe what “Hellhound” album is not?

Hellhound is: British, Heavy, Metal. Hellhound is NOT: Fake, Boring, Pretentious.

If you had to pick three songs off “Hellhound” album as your favorite songs, which ones would you pick and why?

“The Chalice”, because I feel it has added a whole new dimension to our sound, “Death Avenue”, because I just really like the vibe of that song and “Attila”, because of how full of power it is as a song.

Is there a specific track from Monument’s discography that you aren’t proud of? Why?

There’s a couple of songs on the first two albums where I was trying too hard to please everyone and were included just for that reason. But that doesn’t mean they are bad songs, they just don’t really represent what this band is.

What kind of music do you listen to, when you are at home? Is it only heavy metal music or do you like also other music genres? Which music genre don’t you like at all?

I listen to heavy metal a lot, obviously, but I also listen to 80’s pop as well as more obscure stuff. I absolutely can not listen to black metal, with the exception of Rotting Christ, who are one of my favourite bands, or hip hop/rap.

Is there a musician, with whom you would like to co-operate in studio or on stage? And why?

I always enjoy working with Bob Katsionis, as we have done a few times in the past. We have also worked with Richie Faulkner from Judas Priest, who is an old friend of mine and played a guest solo in the title track of the first Monument EP and he is another person that I would love to work with again. As far as people I have never worked with, it would probably be someone like Matt Barlow (Ashes of Ares, Sentinels, ex – Iced Earth, Pyramaze), I think doing a duet with Matt would be pretty cool.

When and how did you decide to become a singer?

At the age of 18, when I could not find a singer that could actually sing, haha! I was a guitar player at the time.

Monument are described as a New Wave of British Heavy Metal band. Very few bands play in that style nowadays. First of all, do you accept this definition? And if yes, why did you decide to play in that style? Why didn’t you select a different, more popular music style?

If you are real to yourself, you don’t select the style you want to play, it selects you. We never sat down and said “ok lads, let’s pretend to be NWOBHM”, we ARE a British heavy metal band with two lead guitars, lead bass, drums and vocals, I think the surprising thing would be to sound like Pantera or something, haha! We just play what comes natural to us and the results are what you hear on our albums. We don’t care if it is popular or not, we will keep being true to ourselves and try our hardest to make sure that true British metal survives, no matter what.

Many fans believe that Monument is a continuation of the classic 80s heavy metal bands (Iron Maiden, Saxon, Running Wild etc.). Do you believe that you are continuing this legacy?

100%, that is partly why the band is called Monument in the first place. We feel that, since no one else is doing it, we must assure that this, distinctively British, style of music doesn’t fade away once the great bands that came before us stop doing it.

Is Monument a band which likes to follow a certain music “path” or do you like to experiment with your sound?

I always try to expand our sound and I am certainly not afraid to experiment, but I think at the end of the day what I write will always sound NWOBHM in its core as this is what comes naturally to me.

Some doubters accuse you of copying the music style of these classic metal bands. Which is your answer to them? And generally speaking, how do you react to negative criticism?

I never pay attention to critics, the majority of critics are failed musicians, that is just a fact, they are not there to enjoy themselves with some great music, they are there to spread vitriol in order to help their self esteem and feel better about being a failure. I only care about the opinions of people who are real fans of heavy metal and are looking for a band they can be proud of and will be there for them to offer them what they need (great music and live shows) on a consistent basis. Those are the people I listen to. Now regarding us copying a certain musical style, like I mentioned earlier, Monument is the real deal, we don’t try to sound like a British metal band, we ARE a British metal band and what you hear when you play a Monument album is what a bunch of guys from the UK who grew up listening to Iron Maiden, Thin Lizzy and Judas Priest sounds like, when they are put in a room together.

Can you give us some info about the mascot of the band, Jack? How did you decide to have this mascot? Does Jack symbolize something for you and the band?

Not many people know this but Jack is the product of some advice I got directly from Bruce Dickinson on the subject of mascots. In my opinion, Jack is the best heavy metal mascot since Eddie, I truly believe that. Most bands when they decide to create a mascot they just end up copying Eddie or just use a generic skull etc. With Jack, he is a brand new character and tell you absolutely everything you need to know about the band the moment you see him, and that is what a great mascot does.

Which are your future plans?

We are currently adding more dates to our touring schedule for winter so we will be busy touring and promoting the album for the next year or so and then we are heading in to the studio to record the next studio album.

Thank you very much for your time and answers, Peter!

Thanks a lot for having me, I appreciate your support!

 

Open Burn is a new prog/power metal band from the United States, which features three members of the legendary US metal band, Lethal [Dell Hull (guitars), Glen Cook (bass) and Jerry Hartman (drums)]. All US metal maniacs have warmly welcomed the band and its first full-length album, “Divine Intermission”, a disc that should be appreciated for its genuine feeling of power and progress. Myth of Rock magazine couldn’t resist the possibility of an Open Burn interview and the band’s guitarist, Dell Hull, answered our questions. Read the following lines and let the metal flow!

by Dimitris Zacharopoulos


How was Open Burn formed?

Jerry and I first got together with Eric in the late summer of 2015 to play cover songs for a friend’s benefit. Things seemed to gel so we started working on original material soon afterwards. Glen joined us in 2016 after we got back from Greece with Lethal.

Why did you pick the name Open Burn for the band?

We were looking for a name for a while and couldn’t find anything that fit. One day on my way to the studio I saw a painted sign in a field that said “open burn”. I sort of jokingly mentioned it to the guys as a band name. Glen said he liked it so it stuck.

Open Burn features three members of Lethal. Would you say that Open Burn is the reincarnation of Lethal?

Definitely not. Open Burn is a completely different thing. Like I said, Glen joined us later so that was just a coincidence and had nothing to do with Lethal. Of course, since we have played together since the early 80’s he was a perfect fit.

 How would you define the music of Open Burn?

That’s a tough one. We’re just playing what we like, not what we think people want to hear so I see it from a different perspective. I’ve heard people say it is like “traditional” heavy metal so I guess that seems to sum it up pretty well? Traditional heavy metal with a modern sound I guess?

One of the strong elements of your music is the voice of Eric Johns. Do you agree with me?

Of course. Eric is a great vocalist. He doesn’t sound like any other single vocalist but has many influences so as a result, he sounds like himself. In my opinion, he still has a lot of untapped potential. Actually, I think we all do. Hopefully, our new music will help unlock some of that potential.

Listening to the songs of “Divine Intermission”, I get a nostalgic feeling. Would you say that your sound is nostalgic?

I guess you could say that but it doesn’t really feel that way to me. The songs and parts are coming from old influences that each of us in the band has so I guess the songs do reflect those old influences. I guess that gives it that “nostalgic” sound?

Describe the composing process of “Divine Intermission”.

The songs we have written so far have mostly started from either nearly complete songs or musical ideas that I’ve come up with. Eric adds melodic lines and lyrics really quickly so we shape the songs around that as a starting point. As everyone adds their parts that also shapes it further and can even give it a totally different feel. It’s very much a collaborative effort.

Where was the album recorded? Who did the production?

We recorded the songs mainly through two different sessions, except for the acoustic version of “Statues”. Both sessions were done at The Den Recording Company near us here in Kentucky. It was engineered, mixed and co-produced with Dave Swart and ourselves. Dave is also an excellent bass player and has also played with Eric in Simple Aggression among several other bands. They’ve known each other for years. We actually recorded the acoustic version of “Statues”, before Glen joined us, at Justin Newton Audio in Cincinnati. Glen added his parts later.

Where do your lyrics refer to?

You’ll have to ask Eric that one. He keeps it a secret. Lol. Lyrics can mean different things to different people so each person might hear them in a different way? Each song has its own meaning.

What do you recall from the Lethal days?

Long hours of rehearsing in the Cook’s basement. Haha. It was lots of fun of course! We just loved playing. Recording and playing live was fun too but we really didn’t play live much.

“Programmed” is a distinguished US prog/power metal album. How do you see this album now?

It’s hard for me to see it that way because we were just playing what we liked. Even though we recorded the album in one month of straight sessions some things still felt rushed to me. I still remember some of the studio sessions and thinking at the time, we can do this better. Lol. Some of the songs, including Immune, were even written in preproduction. That album came out a few years before the internet and/or social media so we had no idea of any kind of impact it may have been having. I think we’ve just been realizing that in recent years with social media becoming so prominent. The same goes for our ep/demo The Arrival.

How are things now in the States for classic heavy/power metal?

Not great. Large bands like Maiden, Priest, Metallica, etc. are still selling out shows but on a local level, the scene is a lot different. We just play what we like so hopefully our past fans will enjoy what we do now and maybe we will pick up a lot of new fans in the process?

“Divine Intermission” is released by a Greek label, No Remorse Records. How did you come in contact with No Remorse?

We came in contact with No Remorse through our friend and promoter from the Up The Hammers festival Manolis Karazeris. He liked our ep and played it for Chris.

Are you planning to make a tour?  If yes, when and where?

We would love to tour but don’t have any immediate plans yet. Like I said the heavy/power metal scene in the U.S. is not great right now so  I think Europe, Japan and South America would be the best places for us to take our music. It’s just a matter of us finding the right connections to be able to do it.

Your message to the Greek fans!

The Greek metal fans are great and very enthusiastic! So far we have been getting great response to Divine Intermission so we hope more Greek fans will get a chance to hear it. It is a beautiful country so hopefully, we can bring our new music there to a live venue soon!


 

 

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